GARAT Dominique-Joseph (1749-1833), avocat, philosophe et homme politique, ministre de la Justice puis de l'Interieur sous la Revolution, diplomate et senateur.

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GARAT Dominique-Joseph (1749-1833), avocat, philosophe et homme politique, ministre de la Justice puis de l'Interieur sous la Revolution, diplomate et senateur.
L.A.S. "Garat", 4 November "l'an premier de la republique" [1792], to General Anne- Pierre de MONTESQUIOU-FEZENZAC; 4 pages in-4. Interesting letter relating to the treaty signed by Montesquiou with Geneva for the withdrawal of French revolutionary troops from Switzerland. Anne-Pierre, Marquis de MONTESQUIOU-FEZENZAC (1739-1798), appointed General-in-Chief of the Army of the Alps, occupied Savoy, then received the order from the Convention to enter Geneva, but faced with the resistance of this republic, supported by the cantons of Bern and Zurich, he preferred to negotiate, without a mandate, the withdrawal of his troops. The Convention, considering him a traitor, deposed him and decreed his arrest, but he took refuge in Switzerland]. Garat never doubted the patriotic feelings of the general, who was often attacked... " Your so quick and happy entry into Savoy has stifled all the voices that are raised against you; your negotiations with Geneva and your treaty with this republic have made all these voices rise again with greater force". He speaks to him frankly: "The Preamble of your treaty seemed to me to be excellent. Respect for the sovereignty of a small republic that was easy to crush is a fine thing in this moral policy that we profess and promise to Europe". But he condemns the article "in which you forced France to withdraw its artillery not only from the territory of Geneva, which was necessary, but in the territory, in the places of arms of France, which is humiliating for France and absolutely useless for Geneva". And when the French must evacuate all together, why tolerate a progressive evacuation of the Swiss from the territory of Geneva? Garat warns Montesquiou: "You have made the ever-ready democrats suspect that you wanted to keep the aristocratic party from the forces with which it could long impose them on the People's Party. ... you must be told that your dismissal is almost pronounced". Garat, however, defended himself, su
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